Native American Bolo Ties: Vintage and Contemporary Artistry

Native American Bolo Ties: Vintage and Contemporary Artistry

Jun 28, 2014 to Oct 12, 2014

Join us for a fun-filled exploration of the intriguing history of the bolo tie, New Mexico’s official state neckwear. Organized by the Heard Museum in Phoenix, Arizona, the exhibition traces the history of the bolo tie back to 19th-century scarf slides and slide necklaces. The bolo tie we know of today emerged in the 1940s as a challenge to traditional neckwear. While Wickenburg, Arizona’s Vic Cedarstaff laid claim to inventing the bolo in 1949, others disagree.

Nevertheless, bolo ties were haute couture in Western movies and mid-century TV shows, and through the decades have become a major expression of Native American artists including Charles Loloma, Hopi, and Norbert Peshlakai, Navajo. Bolo ties remain popular, and are even re-invented in unique mediums such as glass and ceramics. Be sure to attend the opening reception on June 28th bedecked in your favorite bolos – the more, the merrier!

Native American Bolo Ties: Vintage and Contemporary Artistry is organized by the Heard Museum in Phoenix, Arizona, made possible by the Virginia M. Ullman Foundation.
 

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